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4 Places to Feed Your Faith in Georgia

  • Besser Holocaust Memorial Garden

    Photo courtesy of Atlanta Business Chronicle

The South has always been known as a highly religious region. Christianity has been, and continues to be the most dominant religion, but people of all faiths call Georgia home. In addition to numerous historic churches and synagogues, Georgia also has several unique museums to feed your faith, or gain a better understanding of another religion. All of these museums welcome visitors, regardless of religious affiliation. So feed your faith, or increase your tolerance with a visit to one of these museums.

Monastery of the Holy Spirit. Photo courtesy of the Georgia Department of Economic Development.
Monastery of the Holy Spirit. Photo courtesy of the Georgia Department of Economic Development.

Monastery of the Holy Spirit: The Monastic Life Heritage Center has a museum about the history of the Monastery, as well as life as a monk. See for yourself what it means to be a monk by attending mass at the chapel or talking to one of the monk’s working at the Center. There’s a fabulous gift shop with unique items, like tasty monk made fudge. Be sure to stop at the garden center and peruse the impressive array of bonsai plants.


Photo courtesy of Explorations In Antiquity Center.
Photo courtesy of Explorations In Antiquity Center.

Explorations in Antiquity: Visiting the Holy Land isn’t realistic for most people. But a visit to Explorations in Antiquity Center, in LaGrange, Georgia, about an hour southeast of downtown Atlanta is almost better than a trip oversees. The Center explores ancient Middle Eastern life as a Shepard, farmer and villager, and covers hundreds of years in a compact garden environment, much easier (and cheaper) then traveling to the Holy Land. In addition to self-guided and guided tours, the Explorations in Antiquity Center offers special programs that are well worth the price of admission.


Photo courtesy of the The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum.
Photo courtesy of the The William Breman Jewish Heritage Museum.

The William Breman Heritage Museum: The Breman has a moving permanent exhibit called the Absence of Humanity, which looks at the events of the Holocaust from 1933 – 1945 through the eyes of Atlanta survivors. This is done through numerous photographs, as well as artifacts and even sets, such as a period grocery. In addition to the main exhibit, there are informative traveling exhibits such as Dr. Suess, Rich’s Department Store and Where the Wild Things Are. Although all exhibits have a Jewish link, they are universally enjoyable.

Besser Holocaust Memorial Garden: The garden is located on the grounds of the Marcus Jewish Community Center in Dunwoody, amid baseball and soccer fields. It contains a series of sculptures that depict Jewish life before, during and after the Holocaust. The Marcus JCC is open to anyone, and the garden is a simple place to reflect for those of any faith.

 

Sue Rodman

Sue Rodman is Georgia’s official Smart Travel Explorer and the managing editor of the award-winning family travel site 365 Atlanta Family.

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