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Sneak Peek: Historic Pews and Pulpits Ramble

  • Powelton Methodist Church

    Photo courtesy of Scott Farrar

Georgia's Classic South Region is hosting a historic church tour called the Historic Pews and Pulpits Ramble on June 16, 2017. The bus will depart from the Greensboro Home Depot at 9 a.m. and go through rural east Georgia. There will be seven stops along the way to tour historic churches tucked away but not forgotten. Not only will you get to go inside the churches and hear about their humble beginnings, you'll be inspired by songs and words from some of the chancels and pulpits. Snacks and lunch are included. For more information and tickets, go to https://www.historicpewsandpulpits.com/.

Here is a peek at what is to come on the tour:

Penfield Baptist

Penfield Baptist Church. Photo courtesy of Gail Des Jardin
Penfield Baptist Church. Photo courtesy of Gail Des Jardin

Originally serving as Mercer University’s chapel from 1845 to the university’s relocation in 1871, Penfield Baptist is the epitome of a true "historical rural church of Georgia." This gorgeous Greek inspired church possesses both beauty and rich history. 

Wrightsboro Methodist

Wrightsboro Methodist Church. Photo courtesy of Gail Des Jardin
Wrightsboro Methodist Church. Photo courtesy of Gail Des Jardin

This church is unique in that records show two buildings stood on the site prior to the current building, which was erected sometime between 1810 and 1812. In the early years, the building was meant for all Christian denominations, but only Methodist records have been found. The land is also the resting place for many ancestors of well-known Georgia families such as the founder of the Coca-Cola company, Asa G. Candler.

Powelton Methodist

Powelton Methodist Church. Photo courtesy of Scott Farrar
Powelton Methodist Church. Photo courtesy of Scott Farrar

This church inherited its name from one of the oldest villages in Georgia, Powelton. This village was a large and prominent community in the 19th century, but most records point to a Baptist church, making this Methodist church a bit of a mystery. The current building is not the original, but it is believed to be standing on the original site based on its cemetery age and location. 

Mt. Zion Presbyterian

Mt. Zion Presbyterian Church. Photo courtesy of Scott Farrar
Mt. Zion Presbyterian Church. Photo courtesy of Scott Farrar

This church was organized in 1813 by Rev. Beman. The original structure remains on the site and has recently received renovations. Rumor has it, the University of Georgia almost set roots in this community, but instead went to Athens

Antioch Baptist

Antioch Baptist Church. Photo courtesy of Scott Farrar
Antioch Baptist Church. Photo courtesy of Scott Farrar

This is one of the most unique churches on the tour located between Crawfordville and Powelton. It’s hard to miss this Baptist church from 1899 thanks to two towers at the front. It is actually in need of serious repair in order to restore the church that was built by freed slaves. 

Barnett Methodist

Barnett Methodist Church
Barnett Methodist Church

Barnett Methodist is home to a formerly vibrant community in the 1830’s. Barnett was a village that appeared along the railroad line from Augusta to Atlanta, making it a depot and watering station. Now, most of the community is gone with the exception of this church.

Locust Grove Catholic

Locust Grove Catholic Church
Locust Grove Catholic Church

This stop on the tour is quite unique as it is the oldest Catholic church in Georgia in 1792. The original structure was moved once in 1877, but the building standing today was built in 1883. The church is a reminder of the community that once thrived in the town of Sharon. 

Source: Historic Rural Churches of Georgia

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Hannah Ian

Hannah is a contributing writer for Visit Lake Oconee from Athens, Georgia. She enjoys beauty and lifestyle blogging alongside the perfect cup of coffee.