Itinerary

Guide to Civil War Sites in Georgia

Follow this guide to the essential Civil War museums, battle sites, historic homes, cemeteries and driving trails in Georgia.

  • Museums
  • Battle Sites
    chickamauga-jeffrey-m-frank
  • Landmarks & Historic Homes
    Old Governor's Mansion
  • Cemeteries
  • Driving Trails
  • Learn about Civil War history at these Georgia museums

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  • See where Civil War battles were fought in Georgia

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  • Tour homes and locations with Civil War ties

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  • Visit the final resting places of Civil War soldiers

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  • Follow the paths of Civil War action in Georgia

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Learn about Civil War history at these Georgia museums

Historic High Country

1. Old Stone Church Museum

Used as a Civil War hospital after the Battle of Ringgold Gap, it was recently restored and now houses a Civil War museum. The wooden floor remains bloodstained from its use as a hospital.

2. Adairsville Visitor Center & Rail Depot Museum

The historic depot was there during the Great Locomotive Chase. It contains a museum and photo gallery of local history detailing Adairsville’s role in the chase.

3. Kingston History Museum

The museum contains artifacts found in and around Kingston following the Civil War.

4. Bartow History Museum

The Bartow History Museum offers interactive exhibits introducing the area’s cultural, commercial and agricultural history since the 1840s.

5. Booth Western Art Museum

The War is Hell Gallery is a fine-art exhibit featuring every major event of the Civil War, from the first battle at Manassas to General Lee’s surrender at Appomattox. The art in this gallery is so extensive in detail a printed guide is provided for interpretation; it includes more Don Troiani original paintings than any other collection in the world.

Atlanta Metro

6. Southern Museum of Civil War and Locomotive History

Take a trip back in time for a glimpse into the daily lives of Americans during the 19th century. A reproduction of a turn-of-the-century locomotive factory and an exciting depiction of the Civil War’s Great Locomotive Chase can be found here. The engine General, arguably the most famous locomotive in American history due to its participation in the Great Locomotive Chase, is housed in the museum.

7. Marietta Museum of History

Built in 1845 as a cotton warehouse, it was remodeled in 1855 and became the Fletcher Hotel. During the Civil War, the hotel served as a hospital for both Confederates and Federals. In 1862, the Andrew Raiders spent the night here and, in 1864, General Sherman used the building as a temporary headquarters.

8. The Marietta Gone with the Wind Museum: Scarlett on the Square

The Marietta Gone with the Wind Museum: Scarlett on the Square houses an original collection of movie memorabilia.

9. Atlanta History Center

The Atlanta History Center’s exceptional museum collection includes thousands of items that tell the story of Atlanta, the state of Georgia, and the South. The permanent exhibit Turning Point: The American Civil War features more than 1,500 original artifacts, photographs, dioramas, and interactive components.

10. Margaret Mitchell House and Museum

The birthplace of Gone with the Wind where Mitchell wrote her 1936 Pulitzer-prize-winning novel. Set on a two-acre site in Midtown Atlanta, the Tudor Revival building was built in 1899 and was known by Mitchell as “the dump.” It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and includes the Movie Museum.

11. Road to Tara Museum

Experience the legendary land of Gone with the Wind in Scarlett O’Hara’s fictional hometown of Jonesboro. The museum contains memorabilia from the movie as well as Civil War artifacts.

12. Stone Mountain Park

Home to the world’s largest relief sculpture cut into the world’s largest piece of exposed granite. The park is one of the United States’ most popular attractions, hosting more than four million visitors annually. The Memorial Carving depicts Confederate notables: President Jefferson Davis, General Robert E. Lee and Lt. General Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson.

Northeast Georgia Mountains

13. Crawford W. Long Museum

The Crawford W. Long Museum honors this Georgia physician who is credited as the first physician to use ether for surgical purposes. During the Civil War, Long served as a Confederate surgeon. The museum houses Long’s medical instruments, furniture and personal papers.

Classic South

14. Washington Historical Museum

This historic home and museum features a collection of Civil War relics from the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

15. A.H. Stephens State Park

Named after the vice president of the Confederacy and governor of Georgia, A.H. “little Aleck” Stephens. The Liberty House and museum are located in the 1,700 acre park.

16. Augusta Museum of History

The museums’s award-winning exhibits include Augusta’s Story and the history of the area from the pre-colonial era through the Civil War.

17. Brown House Museum

Restored to original condition, the Brown House was used as headquarters for Federal officers during the occupation and fighting around Sandersville.

Historic Heartland

18. Old Capitol Building and Museum

Milledgeville was the capital of Georgia during the Civil War; the museum is located in the former capitol building. The vote for Georgia to secede from the Union was taken in the building on January 19, 1861. It is considered to be the first example of Gothic architecture in a public building in the U.S.

19. Cannonball House & Museum

This antebellum Greek Revival home, built in 1853, is complete with period furnishings and the original brick kitchen. The house was named in honor of it having been struck by a cannonball during Federal General Stoneman’s raid on Macon in July 1864.

Presidential Pathways

20. National Civil War Museum at Port Columbus

Visitors can stand at the bow of the CSS Jackson, the largest surviving scratch-made ironclad ship in the world. This innovative museum, the best of its kind in the country, explores Northern and Southern naval operations during the Civil War.

21. National Infantry Museum and Soldier Center

This new 190,000-square-foot museum is a tribute to infantry past, present and future. Visitors can take an interactive journey through every field fought by the United States over the past two centuries.

22. Drummer Boy Civil War Museum

This museum is home to a collection of Civil War uniforms and artifacts.

Magnolia Midlands

23. Fitzgerald Blue & Gray Museum

Located in a historical railroad depot, the Blue & Gray Museum has been renovated and redesigned to reveal the remarkable story of the founding of Fitzgerald by Civil War veterans.

24. Heritage Station Museum

This historic museum is located in the old G&F Railroad Depot. It is dedicated to the history of the railroad in Douglas and Coffee counties.

Plantation Trace

25. Lowndes County Historical Society & Museum

The Lowndes County Historical Society & Museum contains information and exhibits featuring Valdosta’s place as a refugee city during the Civil War. Uniforms and artifacts are on display, and the museum contains a fantastic manuscript collection and memoirs from Lowndes County war participants.

The Coast

26. Midway Church and Museum

The Midway Church, built in 1756, was burned during the American Revolution and rebuilt in 1792. During the Civil War, Union cavalry used the Midway Church as headquarters for a month in 1864 while destroying plantations and railroads in the surrounding country. The Midway Museum includes exhibits and information on the Civil War.

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See where Civil War battles were fought in Georgia

Historic High Country

1. Chickamauga & Chattanooga National Military Park

Allatoona Pass, a major supply depot on the Western and Atlantic railroad north of Atlanta, was the site of a ferocious battle on October 5, 1864. The Confederates made a valiant attempt to capture the position but in the end had to retreat after taking heavy casualties. The battle site is headquartered at Red Top Mountain State Park though located outside of the park.

2. Historic Western & Atlantic Railroad Tunnel & Museum

The Western and Atlantic Railroad tunnel is one of the oldest railroad tunnels in the South. During the Civil War, the tunnel played a part in the Great Locomotive Train Chase and was the location of the first fighting of the Atlanta Campaign. There is an onsite museum and the Clisby-Austin house, where Confederate General Hood recuperated after his wound at the Battle of Chickamauga, can be viewed.

3. Dug Gap Battle Park

The park contains more than 1,200 feet of the original stone wall the Confederates built to guard against the Federal attack that occurred at the beginning of the Atlanta Campaign.

4. Battle of Allatoona Pass near Red Top Mountain State Park

Allatoona Pass, a major supply depot on the Western and Atlantic railroad north of Atlanta, was the site of a ferocious battle on October 5, 1864. The Confederates made a valiant attempt to capture the position but in the end had to retreat after taking heavy casualties. The battle site is headquartered at Red Top Mountain State Park though located outside of the park.

5. Pickett’s Mill Battlefield State Historic Site

Pickett’s Mill is located on 750 acres and is one of the best preserved Civil War battlefields in the nation. Visitors can travel roads used by Federal and Confederate troops, see earthworks, and walk through the same ravine where hundreds of Federals died.

Atlanta Metro

6. Kennesaw Mountain National Battlefield Park

The site of Sherman’s worst defeat during the Atlanta Campaign. Miles of hiking trails follow the Confederate and Federal lines. The visitors center includes a bookstore and an excellent museum and research facilities.

Historic Heartland

7. Griswoldville Battlefield

Griswoldville Battlefield is the site of the only major land battle fought between Union and William T. Sherman’s March to the Sea.

The Coast

8. Old Fort Jackson

Constructed in 1808, Fort Jackson is the oldest masonry fort in Georgia. Designed to cover the Savannah River, the fort did not fall until after the capitulation of Fort McAllister on the Ogeechee River. The Confederate ironclad Georgia, moored off of Fort Jackson, was scuttled to prevent its capture and remains today in the riverbed beside the fort.

9. Fort Pulaski National Monument

Fort Pulaski was constructed under the direction of a young Robert E. Lee, graduate of West Point. During the Civil War, the masonry walls of Fort Pulaski were breeched by fire from rifled cannon, and the fort was forced to capitulate to Federal forces on April 11, 1862. This engagement was a turning point in military history as it ended the era of the masonry fortification due to improvements in weaponry. Fort Pulaski was in Federal hands for the remainder of the war.

10. Fort McAllister State Park

Located on the bank of the Great Ogeechee River south of Savannah, the fort is one of the best preserved earthwork fortifications remaining from the Civil War.

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Tour homes and locations with Civil War ties

Historic High Country

1. Gordon-Lee Mansion

An antebellum plantation house set on a hilltop with seven acres of property. September 17- 18, 1863, it was used as Federal headquarters for General Rosecrans prior to the Battle of Chickamauga and a hospital during the battle.

2. Ringgold Depot

This antebellum depot was significant in transporting Confederate soldiers and is the backdrop of the Great Locomotive Chase in 1862. The depot was damaged but not destroyed during the Battle of Ringgold Pass in November 1863.

3. Historic Western & Atlantic Railroad Tunnel & Museum

The Western and Atlantic Railroad tunnel is of the oldest railroad tunnels in the South. During the Civil War, the tunnel played a part in the Great Locomotive Train Chase and was the location of the first fighting of the Atlanta Campaign. There is an onsite museum and the Clisby-Austin house, where Confederate General Hood recuperated after his wound at the Battle of Chickamauga can be viewed.

4. Dalton Depot

Built in 1847, the Dalton Depot was used by the railroad until 1978. This National Register Historic Site was restored in 1990.

5. Oakleigh

This antebellum house served as General Sherman’s headquarters during his march through Calhoun.

6. Cooper's Iron Works

A National Historic Register site, Cooper’s Iron Works manufactured steel for the Confederacy. The iron works were destroyed by the Federal army during the Atlanta Campaign. The massive stone furnace is all that remains.

Atlanta Metro

7. Bulloch Hall

Bulloch Hall, built in 1840, was the childhood home of Ms. Mittie Bulloch who on December 22, 1853, married Theodore Roosevelt Sr. in the dining room. President Theodore Roosevelt visited here many times. The house was a headquarter for Federal soldiers during the Atlanta Campaign.

8. Stone Mountain Village and Depot

Stone Mountain Village was fought over during the Atlanta Campaign and burned during Sherman’s March to the Sea. Two of the three Confederate hospitals in the town are still standing. The depot, built in 1857, was partially destroyed by Union troops but is still in use today as the village’s police department. Stone Mountain also has a Confederate cemetery.

9. Stately Oaks Plantation

Stately Oaks Plantation is a Greek Revival antebellum home near the site of the Battle of Jonesboro, the battle that sealed the fate of the city of Atlanta.

Historic Heartland

10. Taylor-Grady House

This Greek Revival home was built in 1844 as a grand summer retreat and served as the collegiate home of journalist Henry W. Grady, who is credited with establishing the view of the New South after the Civil War. This National Historic Landmark, the architectural masterpiece is now a house museum.

11. T.R.R. Cobb House

A history museum devoted to the study of Thomas Reade Rootes (TTR) Cobb. It was home to a UGA graduate, co-founder of the UGA law school, a Confederate brigadier general, and principal author of the Confederate Constitution. In 1862, TRR Cobb was killed at the Battle of Fredericksburg. With its distinctive octagonal wings and historically appropriate colors, the house has been restored to its mid-19th century glory.

12. Double-Barreled Cannon

The double-barreled cannon was built at the local foundry in 1863 when an anxious community feared attack by invading Northern armies. The double-barreled design was flawed and was not used in battle, but remains a curiosity from the Civil War.

13. Heritage Hall

Heritage Hall, also known as the Johnston-Jones-Manley House, was built around 1811 by Dr. William Johnston, a prominent Madison physician. The house is the home of the Madison-Morgan Historical Society.

14. Jarrell Plantation State Historic Site

This cotton plantation was owned by a single family for more than 140 years. It survived General Sherman’s March to the Sea, typhoid fever, Emancipation, Reconstruction, the boll weevil, the advent of steam power and a transition from farming to forestry.

15. Old Clinton Historic District

This pre-Civil War hamlet is the "town that time forgot" with a number of buildings and historic sites listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Civil War cavalry action occurred in and around Old Clinton.

16. Cannonball House

This antebellum Greek Revival home, built in 1853, is complete with period furnishings and the original brick kitchen. The house was named in honor of it having been struck by a cannonball during Federal General Stoneman’s raid on Macon in July 1864.

17. Old Governor's Mansion

Stately Oaks Plantation is a Greek Revival antebellum home near the site of the Battle of Jonesboro, the battle that sealed the fate of the city of Atlanta.

18. Marlor House

John Marlor, a famous local architect, built this s a wedding gift to his wife in 1830. The John Marlor house is headquarters for a complex of three historic houses making up the Milledgeville-Baldwin County Allied Arts Center.

19. Stetson-Sanford House

John Marlor, a famous local architect, built this federal style house in 1825. It has a beautiful Palladian double portico and original pilasters and is a prime example of plantation architecture.

20. Lockerly Hall

Built in 1839, the mansion is a significant example of the finest plantation architecture in the Milledgeville area, as well as the entire Cotton Belt of the Old South.

Classic South

21. Robert Toombs House Historic Site

The Robert Toombs House is the restored antebellum home of the statesman and radical secessionist. Toombs also served as a Confederate general and refused to have his U.S. citizenship reinstated after the Civil War. He became known as the "Unreconstructed Rebel."

22. Women of the Sixties Monument in Thomson

One of the few monuments dedicated to the role women played in the Confederacy.

23. Confederate Powder Works Chimney

This smokestack was built by the Confederate States of America along with the massive powder works that supplied the Confederate armies in the field with gunpowder. The tower is the only remaining structure.

24. U.S. Arsenal at Augusta State University

Built in 1819 by the U.S. government, the arsenal was taken over by the Confederates. It was then returned to the Federal government, and the arsenal remained in operation until 1955.

25. The Boyhood Home of President Woodrow Wilson

President Woodrow Wilson’s boyhood home has been fully restored and is filled with family heirlooms and artifacts. President Wilson lived here as a boy during the Civil War.

26. Magnolia Springs State Park

Home to the site of the Confederate prison Camp Lawton, it was the largest prison camp on either side during the Civil War. Camp Lawton held prisoners transferred from Andersonville’s Camp Sumter during Sherman’s March to the Sea.

Presidential Pathways

27. Blind Tom Bethune Historic Marker in Columbus

The state historic marker stands at one of two claimed gravesites for "Blind Tom" Bethune. Born a slave, Bethune was a musical prodigy who became known during the Civil War and afterwards for his composition "The Battle of Manassas."

28. Andersonville Civil War Village

Andersonville Village was once the disembarkation point for the prisoners of Andersonville prison. Many Civil War-related businesses can be found in the village.

29. Albany Bridge House at Riverfront Park

Built in 1855 by African American master craftsman Horace King, the bridge house was used to store supplies for the Confederate navy during the Civil War.

Magnolia Midlands

30. Jefferson Davis Memorial Historic Site

On May 10, 1865, Jefferson Davis and family were captured by Federal cavalry at this site. The site is also home to a museum with Civil War artifacts.

The Coast

31. Second African Baptist Church in Savannah

Founded in 1802, the Second African Baptist Church on Greene Square in Savannah is an important historic African American Church where General Sherman made his famous “Forty Acres and a Mule” proclamation from the church steps to the newly freed slaves.

32.St. Johns Church and Parish House

Built in 1852, the Parish House is the former Green Meldrim House, which was General Sherman’s headquarters while in Savannah.

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Visit the final resting places of Civil War soldiers

Historic High Country

1. Confederate Cemetery and Memorial Wall, Dalton

This Confederate Cemetery is the resting place for 421 Confederate and four unknown Union soldiers. A Memorial Wall listing the names of the deceased stands in their honor.

2. Confederate Cemetery - Battle of Resaca

Resaca was the first major military encounter of the Atlanta Campaign. It was the only engagement during the campaign where the entire combined forces of each army were present, facing each other on the battlefield involving nearly 150,000 men. The cemetery was opened in 1866 and contains the remains of Confederate casualties from the Battle of Resaca, May 15-17, 1864.

3. Oak Hill Cemetery

Since 1838, politicos William and Rebecca Felton, evangelist Sam Jones, humorist Bill Arp, U.S. Attorney General Amos Akerman, and numerous other politicians and Civil War soldiers have been buried in this historic cemetery.

Northeast Georgia Mountains

4. Alta Vista Cemetery & Longstreet Gravesite

A large granite monument and American flag mark the final resting place of Lt. General James Longstreet, CSA. He was General Robert E. Lee’s second in command during the Civil War.

5. Old Dan Tucker’s Gravesite, Elberton

"Old Dan Tucker’s Grave" is the burial site of Reverend Daniel Tucker who came to Elbert County to take up a land grant and became one of the county’s most useful a d best-known citizens. Daniel Tucker was best known for his role as a Methodist minister who cared very deeply for the slave population. The song “Old Dan Tucker” has

Atlanta Metro

6. Marietta Confederate Cemetery

Founded in 1863, the Marietta Confederate Cemetery is the final resting place for more than 3,000 soldiers from all of the Southern states. Many of the casualties of the Atlanta Campaign are buried here.

7. Marietta National Cemetery

This historic cemetery was founded in 1866 and has most of the Federal casualties (more than 10,000) from the Atlanta Campaign buried here.

8. Oakland Cemetery

This circa 1850 cemetery contains the graves of many notable people, including five Confederate generals and thousands of known and unknown Confederate dead. There are large African American and Jewish sections as well. The grave of Margaret Mitchell is one of the most visited in the cemetery.

Historic Heartland

9. Memory Hill Cemetery - Milledgeville

Memory Hill is the oldest burial ground in Milledgeville and is the resting place of Georgia legislators, college presidents, slaves, patriots of 1812, Confederate soldiers, writer Flannery O’Connor and wild-west outlaw Bill Miner.

10. Rose Hill Cemetery

Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, this is one of the oldest surviving public cemetery/parks in the United States. Many famous Macon citizens are interred here, including more than six hundred Civil War soldiers, many casualties of the Battle of Griswoldville. Confederate Civil War generals Alford H. Colquitt and Edward D. Tracy are buried here as well.

Presidential Pathways

11. Andersonville National Historic Site

Andersonville, or Camp Sumter as it was officially known, was one of the largest Confederate military prisons established during the Civil War. Built in early 1864, more than 45,000 Union soldiers were confined here during the fourteen months the prison existed. Thirteen thousand of the prisoners died during captivity.

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Follow the paths of Civil War action in Georgia

1. Chickamauga Campaign Trail

This trail marks the route of Union and Confederate soldiers through four northwest Georgia counties, ending at the location of the Battle of Chickamauga, which was the second deadliest battle of the Civil War and site of the Confederacy's greatest victory. Approximately 75 miles (in Georgia)

2. Blue & Gray Trail

Take this self-guided driving tour to more than 60 Civil War battle sites, museums and other points of interest. The trail takes visitors to Chickamauga, site of the greatest Confederate victory, then follows a route from Lookout Mountain to Atlanta, similar to the one that General Sherman took. Approximately 140-150 miles.

3. Southern Belles to Rebel Yells

Enjoy the rich Civil War history of Marietta and Roswell with numerous battle sites, museums, cemeteries, mill ruins, slave quarters, historic buildings, monuments and more. Highlights include Kennesaw National Battlefield Park, Marietta National and Confederate Cemeteries, antebellum homes and more. Approximately 25 miles. 

4. Atlanta Campaign Heritage Trail

For a full year, the focus of Union and Confederate armies was Atlanta. Follow in their footsteps from northwest Georgia through metro Atlanta, learning the experiences of soldiers wearing blue or gray and of the civilians they affected. The Atlanta Campaign Heritage Trail is part of Georgia Civil War Heritage Trails, "the official statewide Civil War Era Historic Driving Trails of Georgia, designated by Georgia's Governor and General Assembly. Approximately 340 miles.

5. Civil War Heartland Leaders Trail

This region of Georgia was home to numerous Civil War leaders, including some of the Confederacy's most notable figures such as Lieutenant General James Longstreet and Crawford W. Long. The trail includes 46 significant sites in Northeast and Central Georgia, including house museums, a working plantation, historical markers and the world's only double-barreled cannon. Approximately 125 miles.

6. Antebellum Trail

A 100-mile journey through seven communities that escaped Sherman's fiery march through Georgia. Highlights include Hay House, Jarrell Plantation, the Old Capitol Building, Uncle Remus Museum, Eagle Tavern, Heritage Hall and numerous antebellum home tours. Approximately 100 miles.

7. Andersonville Trail

Experience some of the best preserved legacies of the Civil War era while travling through central Georgia's quaint towns and rural countryside. Situated among peach, pecan, watermelon, peanut and cotton farms are some of the Civil War's most important sites, including Andersonville National Historic Site, National Prisoner of War Museum, antebellum homes and more. Approximately 75 miles.

8. March to the Sea Heritage Trail

General Sherman's army split into left and right wings to "make Georgia howl" between Atlanta to Savannah. This two-route trail features historic homes, churches, depots, battlefields, forts, museums and more. The March to the Sea Heritage Trail (aka Sherman's March) is part of Georgia Civil War Heritage Trails, "the official statewide Civil War Era Historic Driving Trails of Georgia, designated by Georgia's Governor and General Assembly. Approximately 315 (RW) to 355 (LW) miles.

9. Jefferson Davis Heritage Trail

Still hoping for an independent nation, Confederate President Jefferson Davis and others rode south until captured and taken north, thus ending the Civil War. Follow the historic route traveled by Davis and his pursuers. The Jefferson Davis Heritage Trail is part of Georgia Civil War Heritage Trails, "the official statewide Civil War Era Historic Driving Trails of Georgia, designated by Georgia's Governor and General Assembly. Approximately 350 miles.

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